Day 14: Sharing Our New Writing Styles, New Borders

You’re turning in your final draft of your newly-revised border essay by uploading to this Crocodoc link.

And now the fun part, we get to share what we did, what we’re proud of, what we struggled with, and how we might use these new intercultural approaches to writing and communicating in the future.

Posted in Communication, Composition, Teaching Writing, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Day 13: Journals Due + Peer Conferencing

Today is pretty simple: presentations, journal turn-in time, and peer conferencing.

For your final journal entry, write out a thoughtful response to this question: What’s the one thing you learned in this class that you will take with you in the future and why?

We’ll discuss briefly and move straight into peer conferencing. If time permits, we’ll discuss this video, No One Writes Alone, from MIT. Finally, here’s the link to submit your final pieces.

Screen shot 2013-02-13 at 8.12.26 PM

Posted in Communication, Composition, Teaching Writing, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Day 12: TRL! and Writing Lab Time

No, we’re not watching TRL in class today, it’s The Teaching Requests Live! with Ms. Hoermann Show. Contain your excitement. Or for you young things who still send me confused looks about what the original TRL Show is–or was on MTV–here’s a video to a link we won’t watch in class because quite frankly that would a long trip down memory lane that we don’t have time for: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REqEJdfhHrU.

Some of the requests from yesterday included hooks/ zingers, paraphrasing, MLA formatting, Word formatting, and block quotes. There’s no way we can get through all of that today, but here are some resources you can use today as well as access in the future:

-For hooks and zingers, my favorite resource will always be Zinsser’s “The Lead and The Ending,” but for quick references, check out these visuals from Pinterest.com:

Paraphrasing exercises for The Purdue OWL

The OWL is also a great reference for MLA Formatting. Check out the complete guide by clicking here.

For a step-by-step guide to setting up MLA Formatting in Word, click here. MLA has been around for a long time. For Laura and others interested in this organization, the style it dictates, and why English classrooms use it, click here to read about MLA’s foundations.

You can also find a helpful explanation of block quotations on The OWL’s website (click here), but you’ll have to look for it under the header of “Long Quotations.”

We’ll take more requests if we have time, but we’ve got a lot of ground to cover so let’s get started.

Posted in Communication, Composition, Teaching Writing, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Good Writing” Policy: An Exploration of What It Means to “Get” Writing

If you’re interested in writing, this is a great read:

“Good Writing” Policy: An Exploration of What It Means to “Get” Writing.

via “Good Writing” Policy: An Exploration of What It Means to “Get” Writing.

Posted in Composition, Teaching Writing, Writing | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Revising Borders

Now in our final week, we’re revising the academic essays we wrote last week and repurposing them to fit with a different, international style of expression, such as the African Nommo or the Chinese eight-legged essay. I want to give you more in-class time to work on this assignment, but first we need to take care of some housekeeping:

Are you? And if you write using an international form of expression, does that change who you are (or how you communicate)? Image credit to Flickr.com.

Are you? And if you write using an international form of expression, does that change who you are (or how you communicate)?
Image credit to Flickr.com.

Presentations: Jhony, Yanet, Erika, Cole, and Nina

Journal Reflections: Consider the international style of writing you chose. How might you use this style of expression in future communication scenarios? How will learning it benefit you?

“TRL” Teaching Requests Live

Grade Slips

Tomorrow we’ll be in the lab working on our drafts, so don’t forget to bring your flash drives.

Posted in Communication, Composition, Teaching Writing, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

End of Week II: Revising Our Writing Borders

ia-state-borders.jpg

Same borders, but we’re “re-seeing” them, revising.
Image credit to Flickr.com.

Today we begin revising our writing borders. We’re familiar with the American-Academic English approach to writing, but based on today’s reading, Lisle and Mano pages 16-18, how do intercultural approaches differ?

Let’s brainstorm. Look back to the Lisle and Mano reading as well as the BAC chapter. Based on what you’ve read, write in your journals about what new writing approach you will take. Why are you taking this approach? To try a new style you find appealing? Or are you choosing a new writing organization/ style that might better serve the purpose of your argument?

We’ll discuss together and begin planning individually. But I’m wondering, will you go with the Chinese eight-legged essay? The Japanese ki-shoo-ten-ketsu? The Native American spider’s web? Impassioned Arabic poetics? Or the African Nommo?

Posted in Communication, Composition, Teaching Writing, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Day 9: Finding More Border Talk, More Ways to Write

Once more, to submit your final papers, please click on this link and upload your Word document (similar to last time).

Image credit to Oregon State University's Writing Center

Image credit to Oregon State University’s Writing Centera

After today’s presentation, we’ll start by continuing our conversations on writing-communication borders. First, we’ll discuss a quick read from The Chronicle titled “A Way Out of Silence.” The third and the final paragraphs of are particular interest to us as we continue with our borders theme. So using this as our thought of the day, what do you think?

Time permitting, we’ll watch as much of Writing Across Borders as we can, but we’re also beginning our third and final unit, “Revising Our Borders.” Looking back at what we’ve done, the American-Academic style of writing we’ve used to present these border issues, how can we reorganize and rethink our last papers in a different way? We’ll be trying out intercultural approaches to communication and writing, figuring much of this out together, and with the help of other scholars, such as Lisle and Mano. Let’s get started.

Posted in Communication, Composition, Teaching Writing, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments