Day 2: What are Linguistic Borders?

My first question for you today is: What is a border? How do you define it?image

Next, I want you to write down as many borders as you can think of, i.e. county, state, family, cultural, linguistic, socioeconomic, etc.

Finally, I want you to think about how these borders influence you as a communicator. For example, when you identify as an Iowan, one living within the artificially-drawn and recognized borders of the state of Iowa, do you think you speak as Iowans would speak? Write as most Iowans would write? What does that mean to you, really? In other words, in what ways may that border be influencing you–or not?

Borders can be fluid, not fixed. Check out this map of United States’ borders and dialects. What borders are drawn based on federal or zoning jurisdictions? What borders have arisen based on language patterns used in communities? Do they ever intersect?

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About Jackie Hoermann

Radford Fellow, Graduate Instructor, Doctoral Student English Department Texas Christian University E: j.hoermann@tcu.edu jacquelynehoermann@gmail.com
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5 Responses to Day 2: What are Linguistic Borders?

  1. Pingback: Day 3: Finding Our Borders In-Class Write | Upward Bound Composition Class at ISU

  2. Pingback: Related Articles:Day 2: What are Linguistic Borders?Day 3: Finding | The path way to teaching and studying

  3. Pingback: Day 9: Finding More Border Talk, More Ways to Write | Upward Bound Composition Class at ISU

  4. Pingback: End of Week II: Revising Our Writing Borders | Upward Bound Composition Class at ISU

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